* *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
February 19, 2020, 08:10:50 AM

Login with username, password and session length

Shoutbox

 

Luggnutz

January 26, 2019, 02:25:29 AM
 ;D
 

rollntider

November 07, 2017, 10:33:58 PM
 :D

Author Topic: Scene it  (Read 858 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline BojackHorsefella

  • Starter
  • ***
  • Posts: 1013
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 20
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #45 on: February 05, 2020, 03:02:53 PM »
It's a well I come back to often, but, back in my Circuit City days, I used to find random movies in DVD bins all of the time. This one, from 2007, stars Christian Slater before his resurgence via a guest role in Archer and eventual role on Mr. Robot. It's called "He Was A Quiet Man."

I remember reading the box although I couldn't tell you what it said, but Wiki comes through for that:

"Bob Maconel (Slater) is an insignificant office worker who fantasizes about murdering his coworkers. On one particularly bad day, Bob is about to go on a murderous rampage when his coworker Ralf Coleman (David Wells) beats him to it, shooting up the office and killing several people. Bob shoots Coleman dead with the gun he planned to use on the others."


The clip I've attached is the very start of the movie, beginning with what I suppose would be Bob's "manifesto." Although the movie is from 2007, I bet the rhetoric sounds very familiar from a lot of incel, MRA and just flat-out white supremacy culture. The movie, after the initial shooting, takes a turn with many good things happening to Bob, and yet he can't fully understand why he deserves this, considering what he had set out to do. The movie itself is a tale of Bob feeling like an outsider because of everyone else, but as the movie goes on, we see that Bob's only real issue is his own insecurity. His problems are his own.


I don't know how it would play today, and I can't say the last time I watched it. The whole film is apparently on Youtube, which, wow, but I imagine it may be up for rent on Amazon and such. I remember being absolutely floored by the ending at the time, although catching up on it, I imagine I'd have some different feelings about it now. However, you know how sometimes you find a little cult flick that most people haven't seen, and you cling to that as your recommendation? I've had a few. He Was a Quiet Man was probably the first of that, for me. Something I felt like only I had ever seen, it was my own, free to share with those I wanted to or it could remain a mystery to everyone else.

Anyway, here's the opening:


Offline Crewe

  • Global Moderator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 2043
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 29
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #46 on: February 05, 2020, 05:31:48 PM »
that sounds interesting

Offline Crewe

  • Global Moderator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 2043
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 29
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #47 on: February 07, 2020, 03:07:17 PM »
I'm pulling this scene from the Sopranos. David Chase has a real talent for incorporating music in to his scenes.
This particular one ends this episode as things begin to ramp up between NY and New Jersey, and within Tony's ranks.
I doubt it will mean much to anyone who didnt watch the show, but it was an impactful scene within the Soprano realm.


Offline Crewe

  • Global Moderator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 2043
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 29
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #48 on: February 15, 2020, 02:44:21 PM »
So 1977 was a good year for films and one in particular would be the catalyst for me seeing movies over and over again.
Most think Star Wars in 77 and rightfully so, but you know, if it hadn't been for Star Wars, the highest grossing film that year would have been Smokey and the Bandit. People dont recall this film fondly which surprises me because being barely second to a film that is always in the top tier discussions in "greatest of..." roundtables is quite baffling to me.
So now you know, this is the film that turned me in to a rewatch nerd.


Offline TheNorm

  • Administrator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 1753
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 35
  • I Stand With Immigrants
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #49 on: February 16, 2020, 05:39:27 PM »
I'm pulling this scene from the Sopranos. David Chase has a real talent for incorporating music in to his scenes.
This particular one ends this episode as things begin to ramp up between NY and New Jersey, and within Tony's ranks.
I doubt it will mean much to anyone who didnt watch the show, but it was an impactful scene within the Soprano realm.


This was a damn good episode, and should've given anyone watching the episode a sense that things were getting ready to go off the following season.
Immigrants Built America

Offline Crewe

  • Global Moderator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 2043
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 29
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #50 on: February 16, 2020, 07:01:39 PM »
I'm pulling this scene from the Sopranos. David Chase has a real talent for incorporating music in to his scenes.
This particular one ends this episode as things begin to ramp up between NY and New Jersey, and within Tony's ranks.
I doubt it will mean much to anyone who didnt watch the show, but it was an impactful scene within the Soprano realm.


This was a damn good episode, and should've given anyone watching the episode a sense that things were getting ready to go off the following season.

Agree. This series was so freakin good.

 

Recent

Members
Stats
  • Total Posts: 8184
  • Total Topics: 634
  • Online Today: 95
  • Online Ever: 900
  • (January 21, 2020, 03:13:19 PM)
Users Online
Users: 0
Guests: 89
Total: 89