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Author Topic: Scene it  (Read 6121 times)

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Offline Crewe

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Scene it
« on: January 05, 2020, 07:41:08 PM »
it's hard to keep threads moving here but lets see if we can create some legs;

I was trying for a while to narrow down an idea for a thread revolving around favorite scenes. I tried to shoehorn it in to a top five, but we've had a few iterations over there that fall in to what I was trying to put forth.
Finally, I just thought, lets keep it as general as we can.

Post any scene from any movie that reaches you on any level. Could be one you think is poignant, profound, hilarious, topical, spoke to you on a personal level or even an example storytelling, moviemaking, shot decision etc...
Probably a bit all encompassing but lets give it a go.

Ill start with a scene from Platoon released in 86. Won for best picture.
I really enjoyed history and wars in school and what I was taught and read was very different from what I and many Americans saw on screen.
It was life altering to me in how I viewed that war, its participants, the protests, the treatment of those veterans and the idea of war itself.

I love this portion of Roger Ebert's review:
Instead of battle scenes in which lines are clearly drawn, his combat scenes involve 360 degrees: Any shot might be aimed at friend or enemy, and in the desperate rush of combat, many of his soldiers never have a clear idea of exactly who they are shooting at, or why.

Traditional movies impose a sense of order upon combat.

Identifying with the soldiers, we feel that if we duck behind this tree or jump into this ditch, we will be safe from the fire that is coming from over there.

In "Platoon," there is the constant fear that any movement offers a 50-50 chance between a safe place or an exposed one. Stone sets up his shots to deny us the feeling that combat makes sense.



This scene features Sgt. Barnes (Tom Berenger) having already murdered one civilian, threatening a child because he wanted the villager to admit they were VC. Sgt. Elias (Willem Dafoe) is appalled and takes action. Afterward, he is miffed as to why the Lt. let that assassination occur.
If you haven't seen this film, please do.



Offline TheNorm

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Re: Scene it
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2020, 09:39:23 AM »
That was an incredible movie...also love the premise of this thread, definitely have some stuff to add to this.
“But it is not enough for me to stand before you tonight and condemn riots. It would be morally irresponsible for me to do that without, at the same time, condemning the contingent, intolerable conditions that exist in our society. These conditions are the things that cause individuals to feel that they have no other alternative than to engage in violent rebellions to get attention. And I must say tonight that a riot is the language of the unheard. And what is it America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the plight of the negro poor has worsened over the last twelve or fifteen years. It has failed to hear that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice and humanity.” - Martin Luther King, Jr

Offline Crewe

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Re: Scene it
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2020, 02:27:15 PM »
That was an incredible movie...also love the premise of this thread, definitely have some stuff to add to this.

It really is a flick that needs to be remembered IMO.

I look forward to it

Offline TheNorm

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Re: Scene it
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2020, 07:37:25 PM »
For today's entry, I'm going to go with a scene from the greatest Christmas movie of all-time: Die Hard.  :popcorn:

For me, this was the movie that kind of blew me away and said "this action movie is going to be a little different", and it goes with this scene. Take an unknown (at the time to movie audiences anyway) Alan Rickman, and have him play a pivotal villain...and proceed to watch him exceed any expectations. As Hans Gruber, he was that damn good.

Anyway, this scene. It's just great from start to finish. Gruber saying why there's no reason should keep the code a secret, the two guys to the side briefly exchanging words before Gruber gives that "really? not now guys" look, and you don't even know what that's about until a few seconds later. I'd always seen a bunch of movies prior to that where they give a count but nothing ever happens...this one proved otherwise. And I love it.


I know it's a bit after Christmas, but this a Christmas movie that can be enjoyed year round. :)
“But it is not enough for me to stand before you tonight and condemn riots. It would be morally irresponsible for me to do that without, at the same time, condemning the contingent, intolerable conditions that exist in our society. These conditions are the things that cause individuals to feel that they have no other alternative than to engage in violent rebellions to get attention. And I must say tonight that a riot is the language of the unheard. And what is it America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the plight of the negro poor has worsened over the last twelve or fifteen years. It has failed to hear that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice and humanity.” - Martin Luther King, Jr

Offline Crewe

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Re: Scene it
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2020, 08:48:50 PM »
Rickman was so money!
I loved the side bet you mentioned, it dilutes the tension brilliantly even if only momentarily.
This was such a great story for an action film. Rickman was so business like, not wavering at all in this scene. Takagi called his bluff and he didnt hesitate to usher him off to never never land. Just so damn nonchalant lol
I really hated the ending...the very end, but otherwise, always a fun film and this scene set the tone like you say.

Offline TheNorm

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Re: Scene it
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2020, 09:26:09 PM »
Crewe, the funny thing about that side bet? I legit didn't catch it for a few years.

For tonight I could pick any number of scenes from one of my all-time favorite comedies, but this is the first one I thought of. Just the way she sweetly answers the question "Uh, what kind of music do you usually have here?" and I start laughing for a good couple minutes.


Been a few months since I've watched this one...might need to do it again.

“But it is not enough for me to stand before you tonight and condemn riots. It would be morally irresponsible for me to do that without, at the same time, condemning the contingent, intolerable conditions that exist in our society. These conditions are the things that cause individuals to feel that they have no other alternative than to engage in violent rebellions to get attention. And I must say tonight that a riot is the language of the unheard. And what is it America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the plight of the negro poor has worsened over the last twelve or fifteen years. It has failed to hear that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice and humanity.” - Martin Luther King, Jr

Offline Crewe

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Re: Scene it
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2020, 09:40:36 PM »
Crewe, the funny thing about that side bet? I legit didn't catch it for a few years.

For tonight I could pick any number of scenes from one of my all-time favorite comedies, but this is the first one I thought of. Just the way she sweetly answers the question "Uh, what kind of music do you usually have here?" and I start laughing for a good couple minutes.


Been a few months since I've watched this one...might need to do it again.

Oh I can top that one, Im actually embarrassed to admit this, but its too damn funny: IN the movie Airplane, the inflatable pilot is called Otto.
Only around this Christmas when I watched it, did it dawn on me...Auto pilot! Fuck! How did that escape me for forty fuckin years?!  lol

I love the Blues Brothers, and oddly enough, at the time this film came out, I was a staunch country fan and I looked as quizzical as Dan Aykroyd in this scene when she said that LOL.
Great choice!

Offline TheNorm

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Re: Scene it
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2020, 09:59:05 PM »
OMG dude...yeah, you win that one lol. And oddly enough, I almost went with Airplane tonight too. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
“But it is not enough for me to stand before you tonight and condemn riots. It would be morally irresponsible for me to do that without, at the same time, condemning the contingent, intolerable conditions that exist in our society. These conditions are the things that cause individuals to feel that they have no other alternative than to engage in violent rebellions to get attention. And I must say tonight that a riot is the language of the unheard. And what is it America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the plight of the negro poor has worsened over the last twelve or fifteen years. It has failed to hear that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice and humanity.” - Martin Luther King, Jr

Offline Crewe

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Re: Scene it
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2020, 01:24:20 AM »
OMG dude...yeah, you win that one lol. And oddly enough, I almost went with Airplane tonight too. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Cant go wrong there lol

This submission coms full circle.
I was 11 years old and lived at the movie theatre, arcade/gocart tracks and Astroworld.
I knew Star Wars was being talked about, knew nothing about it, but I watched almost every movie, sans the sappy girlie flicks obviously, that came through my area.

My mom took me and my cousin.
The 20th Century Fox logo, Lucasfilm and then that iconic music blaring through the theatre.
Seeing that massive Corellian Corvette fly through the screen was amazing, or so I thought, when only seconds later this massive Star Destroyer fills up the entire screen and then some. It just kept going and going and going! Holy fuck! This was something seriously different and awe inspiring.
Afterwards while heading home, my mom was so entertained by us because we were over the moon about this film.
When the prequels came out, I had the DVD's and watched them with her, nothing earth shattering as you can imagine, but nice.
Star Wars was a thing for us.
My mom got cancer later on, and when we heard of the new trilogy, she jokingly said, I hope I get to see it before I die. This was early early planning stages of the film, so it was a while before it came to be.
So TFA arrives, my mom can still get around and I take her and my nephew to see this film.
I remember sitting back in my seat, and just watching my mother watch the movie (I had already seen on opening night) and when the Harrison Ford scene played, she was smiling just as she was when I was a kid. She leaned over to me and said I want to see it again.
We in fact saw it again the very next week.
Thats how those films affected my life in part.
I will always always cherish such simple times that brought so much joy to us.


Offline TheNorm

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Re: Scene it
« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2020, 09:49:47 AM »
That scene was definitely on my list, but I can't top that. Love how movies bring us all together in different ways. Thanks for sharing that, man. :)
“But it is not enough for me to stand before you tonight and condemn riots. It would be morally irresponsible for me to do that without, at the same time, condemning the contingent, intolerable conditions that exist in our society. These conditions are the things that cause individuals to feel that they have no other alternative than to engage in violent rebellions to get attention. And I must say tonight that a riot is the language of the unheard. And what is it America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the plight of the negro poor has worsened over the last twelve or fifteen years. It has failed to hear that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice and humanity.” - Martin Luther King, Jr

Offline Rigg44

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Re: Scene it
« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2020, 02:43:49 PM »
OMG dude...yeah, you win that one lol. And oddly enough, I almost went with Airplane tonight too. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Cant go wrong there lol

This submission coms full circle.
I was 11 years old and lived at the movie theatre, arcade/gocart tracks and Astroworld.
I knew Star Wars was being talked about, knew nothing about it, but I watched almost every movie, sans the sappy girlie flicks obviously, that came through my area.

My mom took me and my cousin.
The 20th Century Fox logo, Lucasfilm and then that iconic music blaring through the theatre.
Seeing that massive Corellian Corvette fly through the screen was amazing, or so I thought, when only seconds later this massive Star Destroyer fills up the entire screen and then some. It just kept going and going and going! Holy fuck! This was something seriously different and awe inspiring.
Afterwards while heading home, my mom was so entertained by us because we were over the moon about this film.
When the prequels came out, I had the DVD's and watched them with her, nothing earth shattering as you can imagine, but nice.
Star Wars was a thing for us.
My mom got cancer later on, and when we heard of the new trilogy, she jokingly said, I hope I get to see it before I die. This was early early planning stages of the film, so it was a while before it came to be.
So TFA arrives, my mom can still get around and I take her and my nephew to see this film.
I remember sitting back in my seat, and just watching my mother watch the movie (I had already seen on opening night) and when the Harrison Ford scene played, she was smiling just as she was when I was a kid. She leaned over to me and said I want to see it again.
We in fact saw it again the very next week.
Thats how those films affected my life in part.
I will always always cherish such simple times that brought so much joy to us.


Thanks for sharing that! I love that movie series but wow your relationship with it can't be matched.

Offline Crewe

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Re: Scene it
« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2020, 03:46:20 PM »
Appreciate that fellas, and yes I love the effect the movies can have on us

Offline BojackHorsefella

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Re: Scene it
« Reply #12 on: January 16, 2020, 02:14:56 PM »
These are all great picks, and it's not a competition. However, you have all overlooked the greatest scene in movie history. :P


Picture, if you will, three men on a tremendous journey. They don't know when their journey will end. Hell, they barely know each other. You might say two of the men are friends, although not for very long. And the third one tends to act like a colossal dick.

Yet, but for a moment, all three find common ground and bonding. Comparing scars (all but one of them, who looks at his, and decides not to comment), drinking alcohol, and yukking it up, it's an incredible release of tension, a joyous moment after horrors all have seen.

And then, with a single question ("What's that one?"), the scene immediately turns, and becomes something more terrifying than what they're up against.

I give you...
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

The USS Indianapolis scene.




Offline Crewe

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Re: Scene it
« Reply #13 on: January 16, 2020, 11:44:49 PM »
These are all great picks, and it's not a competition. However, you have all overlooked the greatest scene in movie history. :P


Picture, if you will, three men on a tremendous journey. They don't know when their journey will end. Hell, they barely know each other. You might say two of the men are friends, although not for very long. And the third one tends to act like a colossal dick.

Yet, but for a moment, all three find common ground and bonding. Comparing scars (all but one of them, who looks at his, and decides not to comment), drinking alcohol, and yukking it up, it's an incredible release of tension, a joyous moment after horrors all have seen.

And then, with a single question ("What's that one?"), the scene immediately turns, and becomes something more terrifying than what they're up against.

I give you...
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

The USS Indianapolis scene.



This thread is intended for scenes that mean something to you, affected you, your life in some way, could be any kind of scene.
All that said, Jaws scared the crap out of me, and this scene turned out the lights.

Offline BojackHorsefella

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Re: Scene it
« Reply #14 on: January 16, 2020, 11:53:54 PM »
Whoops, completely missed the concept. My bad, Crewe.

 

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