* *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
July 11, 2020, 10:13:21 AM

Login with username, password and session length

Shoutbox

 

Luggnutz

January 26, 2019, 02:25:29 AM
 ;D
 

rollntider

November 07, 2017, 10:33:58 PM
 :D

Author Topic: Scene it  (Read 6123 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline TheNorm

  • Administrator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 1887
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 35
  • Immigrants Built America
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #60 on: March 24, 2020, 06:47:45 PM »
Dammit, how did I miss this post? Haven't seen Porky's in forever.

Anyway, I could post a bunch of different scenes from this movie but this is the one that always gets me every single time. Leslie Nielsen was the best.

“But it is not enough for me to stand before you tonight and condemn riots. It would be morally irresponsible for me to do that without, at the same time, condemning the contingent, intolerable conditions that exist in our society. These conditions are the things that cause individuals to feel that they have no other alternative than to engage in violent rebellions to get attention. And I must say tonight that a riot is the language of the unheard. And what is it America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the plight of the negro poor has worsened over the last twelve or fifteen years. It has failed to hear that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice and humanity.” - Martin Luther King, Jr

Offline Crewe

  • Global Moderator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 2338
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 29
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #61 on: March 24, 2020, 10:31:37 PM »
That Porky's movie was so raunchy lol and that scene was so contagious with the laughter.

Man, Leslie Nielson was just plain money!
I remember when I saw him in on Carson, he was just the same. Reminded me of a great storyteller, like Tim Conway or Bob Uecker. haha

Offline Crewe

  • Global Moderator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 2338
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 29
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #62 on: April 02, 2020, 01:30:07 PM »
Cheech and Chong Next Movie

Their rock comedy albums were legendary just a few short years later when Up In Smoke arrived in 78 and I was completely on board.
Listening to their albums again and again and seeing their movies again an again. With so many great ones, I tend to revert back to the welfare office scene in Next Movie (1980)
While Cheech is receiving special attention from his girlfriend slash welfare worker in the back room, Chong is to hang out for a while among folks who need a helping hand as well.
I recognized the old man from the Burt Reynolds classic, The Longest Yard (1974) and of course Michael Winslow appears here in his first over film.
C&C also gave him a role in Nice Dreams which came out in 1981.
Winslow would go on to great acclaim in the Police Academy films beginning just four years from his debut.

This scene always got me because of the old man's ability to laugh on cue and of course, Winslow just being a one man show per the norm.
I liked how the old man would be cued to laugh by the weary man across from him folding over in to a deep sleep but the abrupt outburst would sit him straight up...and the ashes on the cigarette lol. So much to enjoy here for me.
Siting in the theatre laughing my ass off at these guys for years and years.


Offline Crewe

  • Global Moderator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 2338
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 29
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #63 on: April 26, 2020, 05:27:06 PM »
The first time I saw this picture, it's safe to say I had no idea what it was about, only that it was one I read about in the teen music and movie mags (no internet then and this was how you stayed hip)

If you've seen it, you know. When it starts, it was obviously a campy film but th audience was shouting in unison at the screen and it seemed like fun.
When we introduced to the "guests" at the mansion, I was thinking, ok, this is getting to be a bit much.
Boy was I in store for a surprise.
I didnt know what transexuals were, I barely knew what homosexuals were, and it's safe to say, my youthful eyes had never seen anything like this before.
After it was over, I was hooked. The audience participation was off the charts an soon, I was a regular

I even had th soundtrack. Don't judge, it's unhealthy.


Offline TheNorm

  • Administrator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 1887
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 35
  • Immigrants Built America
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #64 on: May 04, 2020, 12:35:45 PM »
I love that movie, and damn I miss Tim Curry. Yes I know he's still alive but damn that stroke.

Anyway, since it's May the 4th I felt I had to share one of the best scenes from the best Star Wars movie since Disney took over. This was that "oh shit, it's about to get real" moment, and helped to remind a lot of people that growing up, Darth Vader was the baddest villain in the galaxy.

“But it is not enough for me to stand before you tonight and condemn riots. It would be morally irresponsible for me to do that without, at the same time, condemning the contingent, intolerable conditions that exist in our society. These conditions are the things that cause individuals to feel that they have no other alternative than to engage in violent rebellions to get attention. And I must say tonight that a riot is the language of the unheard. And what is it America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the plight of the negro poor has worsened over the last twelve or fifteen years. It has failed to hear that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice and humanity.” - Martin Luther King, Jr

Offline Crewe

  • Global Moderator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 2338
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 29
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #65 on: May 07, 2020, 02:01:58 PM »
That was such a great scene!
Before Ep 9, I watched all the SW in order and this was the coolest transition from film to film.

City Slickers

This was one of those films like Back to the Future where our whole family went to see it on a night out.
It's such a fun film toes, everyone had a great time, it's just one of those instances that was rare that Ill enjoy my entire life.
I love this clip at :58 when Billy Crystal's friends completely abandoned him, like a true friend would in such a case lol


Offline TheNorm

  • Administrator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 1887
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 35
  • Immigrants Built America
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #66 on: May 11, 2020, 10:05:34 AM »
Fun fact: I've never seen City Slickers. :gasp: So I used to work at Blockbuster for a few years, and this movie came out during that time. Like all New Releases, this one was really difficult to get the first few weeks it was on VHS. I also have this thing where...well, you know how when someone tells you that you just *have* to check out this new so and so, and then you get stubborn and say well now I'm not going to check it out?
Only certain people could give me that response...and one of them was our store manager at the time. Smarmy douchey little f'er. Well damn if he didn't love that movie, and just had to find people to see it too and talk about it, and give you a little grief if you hadn't seen it yet. Naturally it went from I need to check that out at some point to 'not in your lifetime' (he never realized why most of the other people that worked for him didn't see it either). Anyway, I need to add that back to the "need to check it out" pile again. Man I really hated that guy lol

So here's one of my favorite cameo appearances ever from Airplane!. "Listen kid, I've been hearing that crap ever since I was at UCLA."


“But it is not enough for me to stand before you tonight and condemn riots. It would be morally irresponsible for me to do that without, at the same time, condemning the contingent, intolerable conditions that exist in our society. These conditions are the things that cause individuals to feel that they have no other alternative than to engage in violent rebellions to get attention. And I must say tonight that a riot is the language of the unheard. And what is it America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the plight of the negro poor has worsened over the last twelve or fifteen years. It has failed to hear that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice and humanity.” - Martin Luther King, Jr

Offline Crewe

  • Global Moderator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 2338
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 29
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #67 on: May 11, 2020, 11:18:43 AM »
lol norm, I love a guy who can hold a grudge and take a stand  :D
Yea, it really is a good fun flick, Id be curious to hear your thoughts about it

And you just cant go wrong with Airplane!!
KAJ was great, but Im still partial to June Cleaver, you know, the jive talking honkey

Offline Crewe

  • Global Moderator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 2338
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 29
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #68 on: May 14, 2020, 09:07:27 PM »
Going with a classic here for obvious reasons.
This movie really captured the epitome of the stereotypes it was presenting which is what made it so relatable.
Being on my way out of high school when this film dropped made it so much more special to me and my friends.
Great scenes throughout, and I had a tough tie deciding which to go with here, but ultimately this won out because it was so quotable, and believe me, used again and again ad nauseam.
A close second was the, "is your dad Mr. Rogers?"
"No, Mr. Johnson" lol

Oh and, "that's impossible sir, it's in Johnson's shorts." Stoner buds in school dropped this one a lot.


Offline Crewe

  • Global Moderator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 2338
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 29
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #69 on: May 26, 2020, 01:06:46 AM »
This scene isn't deeply meaningful to me like some others in this thread, but I just pulled this flick out of the re watch bin yesterday and it's still quite fun to watch. Just the perfect blend of camp, comedy and action. I feel like Pirates of the Caribbean followed this films palate which is not a bad thing.
So, this scene has Danny Glover robbing the bank with Maverick (Mel Gibson) inside and during the hold up, they share this flash of recognition with a beautifully set up score from Lethal Weapon playing faintly as they strain to recall if they know each other.
Fun stuff.


Offline TheNorm

  • Administrator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 1887
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 35
  • Immigrants Built America
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #70 on: May 26, 2020, 09:31:40 AM »
That may be my favorite scene from that movie, which I honestly haven't seen since it dropped. Even has Murtaugh's classic line at the end...which I find myself uttering more and more lol.

Now I may have to fire up those Lethal Weapon movies for a rewatch.
“But it is not enough for me to stand before you tonight and condemn riots. It would be morally irresponsible for me to do that without, at the same time, condemning the contingent, intolerable conditions that exist in our society. These conditions are the things that cause individuals to feel that they have no other alternative than to engage in violent rebellions to get attention. And I must say tonight that a riot is the language of the unheard. And what is it America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the plight of the negro poor has worsened over the last twelve or fifteen years. It has failed to hear that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice and humanity.” - Martin Luther King, Jr

Offline Crewe

  • Global Moderator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 2338
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 29
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #71 on: May 26, 2020, 09:46:02 AM »
yea it was great how they tossed that line in at the end.

Offline Crewe

  • Global Moderator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 2338
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 29
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #72 on: June 05, 2020, 05:54:13 AM »
Start your Friday off with a chuckle..it is Friday isn't it?
You fellas probably dont know this show, but SOAP was a spoof of all the daytime soap operas which were unbelievably huge at the time (late seventies and especially 80's) and it was a huge hit.
I think it was the first show that continually ran the viewer discretion warning announcement during the first season. All in the Family had the serious disclaimer prior to its airing of the pilot but not before every show.
This program was meant to be so over the top while having serious thematic arcs and it hit on all cylinders.
You see Billy Crystal in his first big break as Jodie, a gay man wanting a sex change (this caused a huge outrage at the time) Richard Mulligan at his best as Bert Campbell and a stellar cast, quite a few who ironically were soap stars in the 60's and 70's.
Frank sex discussions (I think this show was the first to use the word horny), marital infidelity, murder, interracial dating, prison,  a ventriloquist and space aliens are just a few topics. If you need to check out for a while and just laugh, give this a look.


My family used to watch this show religiously and I remember us laughing our asses off and we recalled so many scenes over the years with fondness, it was really a good memory and I still think of us all sitting around watching SOAP.
This scene features Jay Johnstone (still active today) as Chuck (the ventriloquist) with Bob who is trying to ease family tensions during a tough time with some comedic relief.
I love the incredulous look on Mary's face throughout as both Danny (Ted Waas) and Bert (Richard Mulligan) buy in to Bob's ability to read minds.
Take two minutes...





Offline TheNorm

  • Administrator
  • All Conference Team
  • *****
  • Posts: 1887
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 35
  • Immigrants Built America
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #73 on: June 08, 2020, 02:36:01 PM »
Soap...I vaguely remember that show but I remember watching Benson (the spinoff, right?) more. That was a good one though...

Anyway, five pages in and we haven't touched on Godfather? Huh, time to fix that. I think this scene here perfectly sets up the finale of the first movie. Granted you miss Michael and Vito's conversation before this that provides the "oh damn, it's him that flipped" moment for everyone. Barzini with just a look of no real remorse for the family but mild contempt, and then openly celebrating his apparent coronation. Whoops. Damn I love these first two movies.

“But it is not enough for me to stand before you tonight and condemn riots. It would be morally irresponsible for me to do that without, at the same time, condemning the contingent, intolerable conditions that exist in our society. These conditions are the things that cause individuals to feel that they have no other alternative than to engage in violent rebellions to get attention. And I must say tonight that a riot is the language of the unheard. And what is it America has failed to hear? It has failed to hear that the plight of the negro poor has worsened over the last twelve or fifteen years. It has failed to hear that the promises of freedom and justice have not been met. And it has failed to hear that large segments of white society are more concerned about tranquility and the status quo than about justice and humanity.” - Martin Luther King, Jr

Offline BojackHorsefella

  • Starter
  • ***
  • Posts: 1125
  • Country: us
  • Reputation: 20
    • View Profile
Re: Scene it
« Reply #74 on: June 08, 2020, 06:21:16 PM »
This one's not a movie, and requires some setup. I apologize.

I recently began, for the first time ever, watching Avatar: The Last Airbender on Netflix. Well, actually, I've already finished it. An amazing series.

It seems the overall consensus is that season 2, episode 15, "Tales of Ba Sing Se," is one of the best episodes of the series, and that's a sentiment I agree with. I imagine part of it is just that it's an anthology style episode and those are always pretty fun. We follow individual characters on short journeys, mostly character enforcing.

One of the characters who gets his own segment is Uncle Iroh. Iroh was a general in the Fire Nation, known for his 600 day siege on Ba Sing Se, which he ultimately had to retreat from during the war. Since then, Iroh has accompanied his nephew, Prince Zuko, to find and capture the Avatar.

However, throughout the show, Iroh's seen as a pretty chill dude. He mostly wants to drink tea, and at this point, him and Zuko have been banned from the Fire Nation and are secretly living in the Earth-bending capital of Ba Sing Se (it sounds like a lot, it's really not, please watch this show it's incredible).

We know Iroh is different from how the Fire Nation has been portrayed due to his lessons for Zuko, who is controlled by anger and a need to restore his honor. In this episode, seeing Iroh on his own without Zuko, strolling around the city, behaving the same way he does with Zuko, further reinforces his good heart and intentions.

We don't know much about Iroh, except that he was the Fire Lord's brother, his previous turn as a general, and he once had a son. We don't know much about his son, how old he was, or what happened to him.

Early in the episode, Iroh's at a market and a small child starts crying and his mother can't make him stop. Iroh pulls out an instrument and plays a little song. The child is holding a little toy, and Iroh sings about "brave soldier boy." it's a touching moment, played for something as a lark as the boy stops crying, but then grabs and pulls on Iroh's (impressive) beard.

Iroh continues to stroll, helping others here and there (this harkens back to something Iroh says in a far earlier episode, when he states "sometimes the best way to help yourself is by helping others). He even helps a man that attempts to mug him.

However, then we get to the end of the episode. Iroh lays out his belongings, and speaks to his son, saying "if only I could have helped you." Then, we get a reprise of the song.

Additionally, the man who voiced Uncle Iroh, Mako (who you may recall as the voice of Aku from Samurai Jack, or even as Master Splinter in that "TMNT" cartoon movie from the early 2000s), passed away after this episode, making this the last time he would voice the character. The man who took over for him (and also voiced Aku in the final Samurai Jack season), refuses to sing the song out of respect for Mako.

And, with that, I give you one of the most famous scenes from the show: the "Leaves From the Vine" scene. I watched this weeks ago and it's just stuck with me.


 

Recent

Members
Stats
  • Total Posts: 8776
  • Total Topics: 654
  • Online Today: 34
  • Online Ever: 900
  • (January 21, 2020, 03:13:19 PM)
Users Online
Users: 0
Guests: 24
Total: 24