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General Discussion => Chit Chat => Topic started by: Crewe on January 05, 2020, 07:41:08 PM

Title: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 05, 2020, 07:41:08 PM
it's hard to keep threads moving here but lets see if we can create some legs;

I was trying for a while to narrow down an idea for a thread revolving around favorite scenes. I tried to shoehorn it in to a top five, but we've had a few iterations over there that fall in to what I was trying to put forth.
Finally, I just thought, lets keep it as general as we can.

Post any scene from any movie that reaches you on any level. Could be one you think is poignant, profound, hilarious, topical, spoke to you on a personal level or even an example storytelling, moviemaking, shot decision etc...
Probably a bit all encompassing but lets give it a go.

Ill start with a scene from Platoon released in 86. Won for best picture.
I really enjoyed history and wars in school and what I was taught and read was very different from what I and many Americans saw on screen.
It was life altering to me in how I viewed that war, its participants, the protests, the treatment of those veterans and the idea of war itself.

I love this portion of Roger Ebert's review:
Instead of battle scenes in which lines are clearly drawn, his combat scenes involve 360 degrees: Any shot might be aimed at friend or enemy, and in the desperate rush of combat, many of his soldiers never have a clear idea of exactly who they are shooting at, or why.

Traditional movies impose a sense of order upon combat.

Identifying with the soldiers, we feel that if we duck behind this tree or jump into this ditch, we will be safe from the fire that is coming from over there.

In "Platoon," there is the constant fear that any movement offers a 50-50 chance between a safe place or an exposed one. Stone sets up his shots to deny us the feeling that combat makes sense.



This scene features Sgt. Barnes (Tom Berenger) having already murdered one civilian, threatening a child because he wanted the villager to admit they were VC. Sgt. Elias (Willem Dafoe) is appalled and takes action. Afterward, he is miffed as to why the Lt. let that assassination occur.
If you haven't seen this film, please do.


Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on January 06, 2020, 09:39:23 AM
That was an incredible movie...also love the premise of this thread, definitely have some stuff to add to this.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 06, 2020, 02:27:15 PM
That was an incredible movie...also love the premise of this thread, definitely have some stuff to add to this.

It really is a flick that needs to be remembered IMO.

I look forward to it
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on January 12, 2020, 07:37:25 PM
For today's entry, I'm going to go with a scene from the greatest Christmas movie of all-time: Die Hard.  :popcorn:

For me, this was the movie that kind of blew me away and said "this action movie is going to be a little different", and it goes with this scene. Take an unknown (at the time to movie audiences anyway) Alan Rickman, and have him play a pivotal villain...and proceed to watch him exceed any expectations. As Hans Gruber, he was that damn good.

Anyway, this scene. It's just great from start to finish. Gruber saying why there's no reason should keep the code a secret, the two guys to the side briefly exchanging words before Gruber gives that "really? not now guys" look, and you don't even know what that's about until a few seconds later. I'd always seen a bunch of movies prior to that where they give a count but nothing ever happens...this one proved otherwise. And I love it.


I know it's a bit after Christmas, but this a Christmas movie that can be enjoyed year round. :)
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 12, 2020, 08:48:50 PM
Rickman was so money!
I loved the side bet you mentioned, it dilutes the tension brilliantly even if only momentarily.
This was such a great story for an action film. Rickman was so business like, not wavering at all in this scene. Takagi called his bluff and he didnt hesitate to usher him off to never never land. Just so damn nonchalant lol
I really hated the ending...the very end, but otherwise, always a fun film and this scene set the tone like you say.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on January 13, 2020, 09:26:09 PM
Crewe, the funny thing about that side bet? I legit didn't catch it for a few years.

For tonight I could pick any number of scenes from one of my all-time favorite comedies, but this is the first one I thought of. Just the way she sweetly answers the question "Uh, what kind of music do you usually have here?" and I start laughing for a good couple minutes.


Been a few months since I've watched this one...might need to do it again.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 13, 2020, 09:40:36 PM
Crewe, the funny thing about that side bet? I legit didn't catch it for a few years.

For tonight I could pick any number of scenes from one of my all-time favorite comedies, but this is the first one I thought of. Just the way she sweetly answers the question "Uh, what kind of music do you usually have here?" and I start laughing for a good couple minutes.


Been a few months since I've watched this one...might need to do it again.

Oh I can top that one, Im actually embarrassed to admit this, but its too damn funny: IN the movie Airplane, the inflatable pilot is called Otto.
Only around this Christmas when I watched it, did it dawn on me...Auto pilot! Fuck! How did that escape me for forty fuckin years?!  lol

I love the Blues Brothers, and oddly enough, at the time this film came out, I was a staunch country fan and I looked as quizzical as Dan Aykroyd in this scene when she said that LOL.
Great choice!
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on January 13, 2020, 09:59:05 PM
OMG dude...yeah, you win that one lol. And oddly enough, I almost went with Airplane tonight too. Į\_(ツ)_/Į
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 14, 2020, 01:24:20 AM
OMG dude...yeah, you win that one lol. And oddly enough, I almost went with Airplane tonight too. Į\_(ツ)_/Į

Cant go wrong there lol

This submission coms full circle.
I was 11 years old and lived at the movie theatre, arcade/gocart tracks and Astroworld.
I knew Star Wars was being talked about, knew nothing about it, but I watched almost every movie, sans the sappy girlie flicks obviously, that came through my area.

My mom took me and my cousin.
The 20th Century Fox logo, Lucasfilm and then that iconic music blaring through the theatre.
Seeing that massive Corellian Corvette fly through the screen was amazing, or so I thought, when only seconds later this massive Star Destroyer fills up the entire screen and then some. It just kept going and going and going! Holy fuck! This was something seriously different and awe inspiring.
Afterwards while heading home, my mom was so entertained by us because we were over the moon about this film.
When the prequels came out, I had the DVD's and watched them with her, nothing earth shattering as you can imagine, but nice.
Star Wars was a thing for us.
My mom got cancer later on, and when we heard of the new trilogy, she jokingly said, I hope I get to see it before I die. This was early early planning stages of the film, so it was a while before it came to be.
So TFA arrives, my mom can still get around and I take her and my nephew to see this film.
I remember sitting back in my seat, and just watching my mother watch the movie (I had already seen on opening night) and when the Harrison Ford scene played, she was smiling just as she was when I was a kid. She leaned over to me and said I want to see it again.
We in fact saw it again the very next week.
Thats how those films affected my life in part.
I will always always cherish such simple times that brought so much joy to us.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on January 14, 2020, 09:49:47 AM
That scene was definitely on my list, but I can't top that. Love how movies bring us all together in different ways. Thanks for sharing that, man. :)
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Rigg44 on January 14, 2020, 02:43:49 PM
OMG dude...yeah, you win that one lol. And oddly enough, I almost went with Airplane tonight too. Į\_(ツ)_/Į

Cant go wrong there lol

This submission coms full circle.
I was 11 years old and lived at the movie theatre, arcade/gocart tracks and Astroworld.
I knew Star Wars was being talked about, knew nothing about it, but I watched almost every movie, sans the sappy girlie flicks obviously, that came through my area.

My mom took me and my cousin.
The 20th Century Fox logo, Lucasfilm and then that iconic music blaring through the theatre.
Seeing that massive Corellian Corvette fly through the screen was amazing, or so I thought, when only seconds later this massive Star Destroyer fills up the entire screen and then some. It just kept going and going and going! Holy fuck! This was something seriously different and awe inspiring.
Afterwards while heading home, my mom was so entertained by us because we were over the moon about this film.
When the prequels came out, I had the DVD's and watched them with her, nothing earth shattering as you can imagine, but nice.
Star Wars was a thing for us.
My mom got cancer later on, and when we heard of the new trilogy, she jokingly said, I hope I get to see it before I die. This was early early planning stages of the film, so it was a while before it came to be.
So TFA arrives, my mom can still get around and I take her and my nephew to see this film.
I remember sitting back in my seat, and just watching my mother watch the movie (I had already seen on opening night) and when the Harrison Ford scene played, she was smiling just as she was when I was a kid. She leaned over to me and said I want to see it again.
We in fact saw it again the very next week.
Thats how those films affected my life in part.
I will always always cherish such simple times that brought so much joy to us.


Thanks for sharing that! I love that movie series but wow your relationship with it can't be matched.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 14, 2020, 03:46:20 PM
Appreciate that fellas, and yes I love the effect the movies can have on us
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: BojackHorsefella on January 16, 2020, 02:14:56 PM
These are all great picks, and it's not a competition. However, you have all overlooked the greatest scene in movie history. :P


Picture, if you will, three men on a tremendous journey. They don't know when their journey will end. Hell, they barely know each other. You might say two of the men are friends, although not for very long. And the third one tends to act like a colossal dick.

Yet, but for a moment, all three find common ground and bonding. Comparing scars (all but one of them, who looks at his, and decides not to comment), drinking alcohol, and yukking it up, it's an incredible release of tension, a joyous moment after horrors all have seen.

And then, with a single question ("What's that one?"), the scene immediately turns, and becomes something more terrifying than what they're up against.

I give you...
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

The USS Indianapolis scene.



Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 16, 2020, 11:44:49 PM
These are all great picks, and it's not a competition. However, you have all overlooked the greatest scene in movie history. :P


Picture, if you will, three men on a tremendous journey. They don't know when their journey will end. Hell, they barely know each other. You might say two of the men are friends, although not for very long. And the third one tends to act like a colossal dick.

Yet, but for a moment, all three find common ground and bonding. Comparing scars (all but one of them, who looks at his, and decides not to comment), drinking alcohol, and yukking it up, it's an incredible release of tension, a joyous moment after horrors all have seen.

And then, with a single question ("What's that one?"), the scene immediately turns, and becomes something more terrifying than what they're up against.

I give you...
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

The USS Indianapolis scene.



This thread is intended for scenes that mean something to you, affected you, your life in some way, could be any kind of scene.
All that said, Jaws scared the crap out of me, and this scene turned out the lights.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: BojackHorsefella on January 16, 2020, 11:53:54 PM
Whoops, completely missed the concept. My bad, Crewe.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 17, 2020, 12:00:56 AM
Whoops, completely missed the concept. My bad, Crewe.

no worries man. I ws just trying to come up with something we could all share and enjoy that wasn't like a top 5 list.
Still a great selection, because this one kept me out of the freakin water for a bit lol.
My cousin and I were even looking into whether we had relatives on the Indianapolis, and learning about that whole story and how close Jaws was to what happened, I mean, dramatic licenses and all but holy crap
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on January 17, 2020, 02:41:05 AM
Itís been a very long time since Iíve seen that movie, and it reminded me why-I too remember seeing this when I was little and being afraid to go in the water for weeks after. Yes, I realize that Michigan is pretty much surrounded by lakes and sharks arenít native to here. Try telling an impressionable 7 year old that lol.

Anyway, I need to watch that movie again. Great pick of a scene from a movie that had quite a few scenes to choose from.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 17, 2020, 09:19:39 AM
Itís been a very long time since Iíve seen that movie, and it reminded me why-I too remember seeing this when I was little and being afraid to go in the water for weeks after. Yes, I realize that Michigan is pretty much surrounded by lakes and sharks arenít native to here. Try telling an impressionable 7 year old that lol.

Anyway, I need to watch that movie again. Great pick of a scene from a movie that had quite a few scenes to choose from.

LOL
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on January 17, 2020, 10:08:51 PM
Haha, you laugh but I'm fairly certain my mom was mad at my dad for a couple days for letting me watch it in the first place lol.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 17, 2020, 11:31:12 PM
Haha, you laugh but I'm fairly certain my mom was mad at my dad for a couple days for letting me watch it in the first place lol.

lol its awesome though, thats the kinda thing I was hoping for in this thread  :D
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 19, 2020, 05:41:09 PM
Another of my favorite films, Back to the Future.
Even though I was an avid movie goer, my family not so much, but we had gone to see this one, and my uncle, who never attended also joined us.
Of course I had already seen it, but you know I have no qualms about multiple viewings ;-)
Good times.

Such charisma and chemistry by Christopher Lloyd and Michael Fox, and especially in this scene where its revealed to Marty the Doc invented a time machine.
This is a mirrored clip I guess for copyright purposes, but its the only one I could find.
At 1:33, Marty is extremely curious with questions about what's going on and Doc is supremely excited and anxious to document everything, telling Marty not now not ow, just screams wonderful ad libbing to me.
At 2:25, Marty asks, you have that hooked up to the....car? Just his delivery was beautiful.
3:30, Doc, while revving the Delorean, slowly eyes Marty up and down, who in turn, slowly returns the wtf gaze.
Just cracks me up. So well done.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Rigg44 on January 20, 2020, 02:08:38 PM
So my first movie-going memories were a mixed bag one was Star Wars and the other Animal House.  I was way too young to be at animal house when it came out, it released in 1978 so I was at most 5.  My sister, my oldest sibling, took me to see it for god knows what reason.  I assume it allowed her to go to the movies by dragging me along and I assume we were meant to go to a different film but I have never asked.  All I know is I have remembered this scene ever since that day, I just thought that car was so cool.  I also remember the angel on one shoulder devil on the other scene but I digress. 

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 20, 2020, 02:20:25 PM
So my first movie-going memories were a mixed bag one was Star Wars and the other Animal House.  I was way too young to be at animal house when it came out, it released in 1978 so I was at most 5.  My sister, my oldest sibling, took me to see it for god knows what reason. I assume it allowed her to go to the movies by dragging me along and I assume we were meant to go to a different film but I have never asked.  All I know is I have remembered this scene ever since that day, I just thought that car was so cool.  I also remember the angel on one shoulder devil on the other scene but I digress. 


LOL having an older sister myself, I can bet that was the case.
So many great elements to this scene.the statue head of Faber on the hood, the train whistle, the double entendre "eat me" and those sunglasses! I scoured till I found a pair just like them.
To this day, I still use that tone when Dean Wormer disgustingly says, Oh my God. LOL
Through the whole ordeal he's thinking there's a serious threat, but he sees Blutarsky and suddenly ..Oh my God hahaha just cracks me up.
That and I hate those guys.
Good clip man!
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: BojackHorsefella on January 20, 2020, 02:47:11 PM
Long ago, in the days I worked at Circuit City, through just the general DVD bins or the holiday DVD bins, extra discounted, I'd come across a lot of movies that were either unknown (say, He Was a Quiet Man), lesser known (Brick, Rian Johnson's first film), and classics that I'd simply missed out on. This, is one of the latter.

When I bought Glengarry Glenross, all I knew about it was what the back of the DVD told me: they're salesman, and they're all incredible actors (Ed Harris, Jack Lemmon, Alan Arkin, Al Pacino, John Cazale, Alec Baldwin, Kevin Spa-er, um, Christopher Plummer). Other than that, I knew nothing going in.

A lot of people will talk about the Alec Baldwin scene, and for sure, "coffee's for closers" made it into my everyday speech as it did for most others. But I've always found another speech to be far more scathing and has lasted far longer in my memory. Most of them discount Baldwin, he's an outsider, from uptown, he's not "one of us." Hell, Pacino's character doesn't even show up for it. Of course he doesn't, though. He gets his own.


If the Baldwin speech is people taking what one stranger says very personally, this scene is two people, one who has been very personally offended, and the other who is about to be. The sheer vitriol in Pacino's speech, and the fact that it not only goes from just cutting Spacey's character down, but to fully invoking his absolute failure in his role, not just as a human being but in the one job he is meant to do in the office, Pacino leaves nothing left. I have loved, and likely forever will love, "you never open your mouth until you know what the shot is." I was left absolutely floored. I'd never seen a Lumet film before!


I think the clip I have goes beyond the Pacino part, although it is funny that "you never open your mouth unless you know what the shot is" immediately comes back up, even if it's not spoken, someone else makes the mistake and pays for it (almost went with that scene too. The whole movie I was rooting for Shelly, and "my daughter..." followed by "fuck you" has always left me feeling some way. But man, the above, it's like the one last good Pacino scene before he just decided to only scream anymore).
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 20, 2020, 03:06:39 PM
Long ago, in the days I worked at Circuit City, through just the general DVD bins or the holiday DVD bins, extra discounted, I'd come across a lot of movies that were either unknown (say, He Was a Quiet Man), lesser known (Brick, Rian Johnson's first film), and classics that I'd simply missed out on. This, is one of the latter.

When I bought Glengarry Glenross, all I knew about it was what the back of the DVD told me: they're salesman, and they're all incredible actors (Ed Harris, Jack Lemmon, Alan Arkin, Al Pacino, John Cazale, Alec Baldwin, Kevin Spa-er, um, Christopher Plummer). Other than that, I knew nothing going in.

A lot of people will talk about the Alec Baldwin scene, and for sure, "coffee's for closers" made it into my everyday speech as it did for most others. But I've always found another speech to be far more scathing and has lasted far longer in my memory. Most of them discount Baldwin, he's an outsider, from uptown, he's not "one of us." Hell, Pacino's character doesn't even show up for it. Of course he doesn't, though. He gets his own.


If the Baldwin speech is people taking what one stranger says very personally, this scene is two people, one who has been very personally offended, and the other who is about to be. The sheer vitriol in Pacino's speech, and the fact that it not only goes from just cutting Spacey's character down, but to fully invoking his absolute failure in his role, not just as a human being but in the one job he is meant to do in the office, Pacino leaves nothing left. I have loved, and likely forever will love, "you never open your mouth until you know what the shot is." I was left absolutely floored. I'd never seen a Lumet film before!


I think the clip I have goes beyond the Pacino part, although it is funny that "you never open your mouth unless you know what the shot is
" immediately comes back up, even if it's not spoken, someone else makes the mistake and pays for it (almost went with that scene too. The whole movie I was rooting for Shelly, and "my daughter..." followed by "fuck you" has always left me feeling some way. But man, the above, it's like the one last good Pacino scene before he just decided to only scream anymore).

That Baldwin scene was the first clip Id watched from this movie and it caught me.
I always felt that was true in any aspect of life. Just a great scene and film.

yea, gonna disagree with that  :D
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: BojackHorsefella on January 21, 2020, 02:06:14 PM
We moved from Ballston Lake, New York, to Columbia, South Carolina over the summer of 1997. Then, come 1998, my dad went and worked for...I don't remember how long, at his brother's accounting firm back on Long Island. It was meant to be temporary, so my mom stayed home with my brother and I while my dad came back on weekends I think, or maybe it was less often, I can't remember so well these days.

What I do remember, is my mom, who was never really into movies, decided we should do dinner and a movie one night a week. I don't think it lasted long, I think we may have seen 3 movies total with our "dinner and a movie," or maybe I just really didn't like the selections, again, my memory is shot. I do remember the first movie though. It was Rush Hour.

I wasn't 100% sure about Rush Hour. I hadn't seen much Jackie Chan and, 1998, I was 11 years old so definitely had not seen Friday, so didn't know what to expect of Chris Tucker. I remember thinking it was going to be an action movie, which it certainly is to one extent, mostly courtesy of Jackie Chan. I didn't really know it was going to be a comedy, I think, which is why I was so caught off guard by Chris Tucker.


This scene is the scene that, above all others ("Who the hell you think you kidnapped, Chelsea Clinton?" or "My daddy could beat up your daddy!" or even "DO YOU UNDERSTAND THE WORDS THAT ARE COMING OUT OF MY MOUTH"), I've remembered ever since. Just Chris Tucker, given about a minute to blow through an absolute riff, and he nails each mark. I laughed then, and I laugh every time when I watch it now, and it's funny on its own merits, and I'd laugh still, but I also remember why this movie even came into my orbit. It was an odd pick, still, looking back, IS an odd pick for my mom to have gone with, but hey, what a classic, funny movie, with some great stuntwork too.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 21, 2020, 02:21:46 PM
Jackie Chan is always fun to watch in almost any movie. His dedication to his craft is amazing. I wish fight scenes would take a hint from him, none of that supremely fast close up editing so you cant tell wtf is going on, but then again, most actors aren't Jackie Chan.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: BojackHorsefella on January 21, 2020, 03:10:49 PM
Forgot to add this, but watching young Chris Tucker again, kinda makes me wonder what he would've been like in a Tarantino film. Ah, oh well.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 21, 2020, 11:50:05 PM
Captain Phillips, spoilers ahead yo if you haven't seen this film...


This scene from Captain Phillips will never fail to make me well up.
Tom Hanks is such an amazing actor, we already knew that, but also hats off to the med team in this scene which really on duty in the infirmary when they decided all of the sudden to shoot this scene. It wasn't in the script.
the filmmakers and Hanks had just shot the scripted ending and then discovered that the real Cat Phillips had been taken to the infirmary, so they decided right then to do the same.
Just an outstanding job by the medical team. Its said Hanks, et al had it in two takes, but did four.
I have such respect for those that take care of us and like this team, just to be able to comfort someone is such an incredible gift and Im so glad this was captured because it truly is a gem of a scene and deserves recognition.
it moves me to tears every time I see it.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: BojackHorsefella on January 22, 2020, 12:07:22 AM
Hanks absolutely nails the going into shock part, and that absolutely floored me when seeing that film.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 22, 2020, 12:17:43 AM
Hanks absolutely nails the going into shock part, and that absolutely floored me when seeing that film.

Me too. I can't imagine the original ending being able to compete with this emotion on any level
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: BojackHorsefella on January 22, 2020, 01:51:41 PM
It took me a long time to get into horror. As a very young child, I had a recurring dream about Gremlins, for whatever reason. The original Twilight Zone movie terrified me. I couldn't watch Freddy or Jason movies.

I don't remember when I started watching horror more regularly, but I do remember being in high school, turning on Cinemax on whatever night, and seeing a movie I'd heard about, but had never seen, was on: John Carpenter's The Thing.

Again, this was one of those "self-discoveries" where it's a movie with a pretty large cult following, and yet, it doesn't get mentioned much (I think it's appreciation has grown even more since that time, especially with the prequel that came out in the 00s, but that's just conjecture).

I remember being absolutely gripped in my spot (probably helped that I always watched movies late so I was likely delirious too) throughout the movie, but I never felt terrified until this scene.


The blood test may be one of the best scenes in the movie, but the sheer chaos of this scene, from MacReady coming in from the cold, to Norris' heart attack, to Norris' chest eating the doctor, and then his head dragging itself away, was an absolute master class in tension that pinned me where I was. Growing up in an age where CGI was becoming more and more prominent (Deep Blue Sea, Lake Placid, just two minor examples off the top of my head), watching a movie with these kinds of practical effects was a revelation for me at the time. And they didn't look silly or preposterous, they were genuinely frightening.

What a good night that was. That used to be the best way to find movies. That and DVD bins.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 22, 2020, 08:42:00 PM
This is a lot of fun, these are the kinds of stories I was hoping to achieve here.

Horror. Man, big time horror fan, only I didnt know I liked getting the crap scared out of me at first. I was lucky or unlucky enough if you will, to have grown up in the horror gore boom and it was freaking great. Late night cable was awesome lol
What got me going was Halloween.
I remember seeing this at the theatre and knowing I could not, under any circumstances, let my friends or anyone for that matter, hear my scream like a little girl.
I had to sit there, play it cool and hope I only peed my pants. Life was good!
So, the scene: The Shape finds Laurie Strode in the closet and she ultimately kills him, she thinks. The kids flee and she's crumpled in the door, a weeping, frightened mess and in the background, out of focus, the Shape does the Undertaker bit before he's even a teenager.
What makes it even more scary is the fact there was no score in that scene for about 2 minutes and it didnt even start up again until a few seconds after he arose. Just freakin great direction. And that ending, man, Halloween was everything.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 24, 2020, 06:24:11 PM
Hanks absolutely nails the going into shock part, and that absolutely floored me when seeing that film.

Didnt he though? And to think, that was almost never even filmed.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: BojackHorsefella on January 27, 2020, 03:20:56 PM
So today, I'm gonna go back in time to a pre-18 age (2002, so.....15). 28 Days Later comes out, a horror movie, that is rated R, thus I am too young to see it. For whatever reason, my mom, dad, and brother are all apparently unable to take me to see the movie. Thus, I end up going with my brother's girlfriend somehow.

I remember, being young, always feeling like you absolutely had to do things the right way or you'd be found out (honestly, to this day I still feel like that which is probably the cause of my anxiety even though nobody cares about the rules these days), so, I'm not a huge fan of breaking the rules. As anyone knows now, I highly doubt the ticket taker was going to ask for any proof of relation, but still, to be safe, we bought two tickets to a different film and snuck into 28 Days Later.

The seats weren't the best, they were aisle seats but they weren't awful. The bad part was probably when I saw a couple basically do a lap around the theater and heard one of them say "How could there possibly be no seats?" Whoops.


100% worth it. What a movie, and an absolutely haunting opener to this day. Any anxiety I had about someone coming into ask for our tickets immediately melted away one Danny Boyle invited us into his vision.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Rigg44 on January 27, 2020, 03:32:29 PM
As most young men tend to be I was extremely anti "Chick Flic" until I watched what I now consider one of if not the only perfect movie ever made.  The Princess Bride.  I know it makes everyone's list and is widely regarded as a great movie.  Well just because everyone agrees it doesn't make it untrue.  I literally could have picked a hundred scenes from this movie.  Quotes from it slip into my conversations almost daily and I am ok with that.  The first time I watched it with my daughters was magical. Now it is a movie we can share and someday I will force my grandkids to watch it despite their inevitable protests, which will be defeated by the movie and its greatness.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 28, 2020, 03:19:15 PM
So today, I'm gonna go back in time to a pre-18 age (2002, so.....15). 28 Days Later comes out, a horror movie, that is rated R, thus I am too young to see it. For whatever reason, my mom, dad, and brother are all apparently unable to take me to see the movie. Thus, I end up going with my brother's girlfriend somehow.

I remember, being young, always feeling like you absolutely had to do things the right way or you'd be found out (honestly, to this day I still feel like that which is probably the cause of my anxiety even though nobody cares about the rules these days), so, I'm not a huge fan of breaking the rules. As anyone knows now, I highly doubt the ticket taker was going to ask for any proof of relation, but still, to be safe, we bought two tickets to a different film and snuck into 28 Days Later.

The seats weren't the best, they were aisle seats but they weren't awful. The bad part was probably when I saw a couple basically do a lap around the theater and heard one of them say "How could there possibly be no seats?" Whoops.


100% worth it. What a movie, and an absolutely haunting opener to this day. Any anxiety I had about someone coming into ask for our tickets immediately melted away one Danny Boyle invited us into his vision.


well now I feel like a criminal because there was a 4 screen cinema (theatre weren't huge multiplexes back then) and I was there most often and wold see every film that week unless I had seen it enough already. it was like you bought a ticket to enter the movie house which granted you entrance to any theatre you wanted as often as you wanted. I guess Ill pay for that some day... :D
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 28, 2020, 03:20:58 PM
As most young men tend to be I was extremely anti "Chick Flic" until I watched what I now consider one of if not the only perfect movie ever made.  The Princess Bride.  I know it makes everyone's list and is widely regarded as a great movie.  Well just because everyone agrees it doesn't make it untrue.  I literally could have picked a hundred scenes from this movie.  Quotes from it slip into my conversations almost daily and I am ok with that.  The first time I watched it with my daughters was magical. Now it is a movie we can share and someday I will force my grandkids to watch it despite their inevitable protests, which will be defeated by the movie and its greatness.


my heart sinks when I utter inconceivable, and nobody bats an eye lol
thats cool that it transcends generations for you.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 28, 2020, 03:41:06 PM
This is a true classic you probably haven't heard about from 1955 called No Time for Sergeants with Andy Griffith.
When I was growing up, my mom worked for a TV distributor and when this came on during the day, she would call me at home during this scene, laughing her butt off and beg me to watch it. Of course once I noted it was black and white, I dismissed it immediately, almost always.
Once I watched it, I then watched the entire film, ad nauseam.

Andry Griffith plays Will Stockdale who is the truest form of a hillbilly who is accused of dodging the draft.
The Government finally finds him and enters him in to the Air Force.
It's a simple fish out of water story that is played perfectly by Griffith.
There's no hidden theme, no plot twists, no mind bending arc, just clean for all pure comedy.
I dont know if younger guys will get the same kick out of it having grown up on vastly different films, but here's a brief scene with the psychiatrist that grabbed me and everyone I ever showed it to.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: BojackHorsefella on January 28, 2020, 03:45:05 PM
well now I feel like a criminal because there was a 4 screen cinema (theatre weren't huge multiplexes back then) and I was there most often and wold see every film that week unless I had seen it enough already. it was like you bought a ticket to enter the movie house which granted you entrance to any theatre you wanted as often as you wanted. I guess Ill pay for that some day... :D

I remember going to movies with my dad, and sometimes we'd do a double feature. We'd finish one movie and hop on into another one. I had no idea this was not allowed, I don't know if maybe I thought, in child think, that a ticket granted you all access but that was certainly not the case, hahaha. I did it with kiddo once or twice, and myself with friends a time or two since, although not so much these days because who has the time?

Plus, you gotta refill the popcorn, and you basically have to do it before your movie ends.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Rigg44 on January 28, 2020, 04:22:23 PM
This is a true classic you probably haven't heard about from 1955 called No Time for Sergeants with Andy Griffith.
When I was growing up, my mom worked for a TV distributor and when this came on during the day, she would call me at home during this scene, laughing her butt off and beg me to watch it. Of course once I noted it was black and white, I dismissed it immediately, almost always.
Once I watched it, I then watched the entire film, ad nauseam.

Andry Griffith plays Will Stockdale who is the truest form of a hillbilly who is accused of dodging the draft.
The Government finally finds him and enters him in to the Air Force.
It's a simple fish out of water story that is played perfectly by Griffith.
There's no hidden theme, no plot twists, no mind bending arc, just clean for all pure comedy.
I dont know if younger guys will get the same kick out of it having grown up on vastly different films, but here's a brief scene with the psychiatrist that grabbed me and everyone I ever showed it to.


This is one of my favorites.  The saluting toilets are great.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: BojackHorsefella on January 28, 2020, 05:41:17 PM

Ever since watching Run Silent, Run Deep on my flight, I've been wanting to go back to some other 50s era films. This clip had me stifling laughter at work, I may need to put this one on my list.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on January 28, 2020, 11:35:25 PM
You guys have had some amazing clips the last few days, and also added a couple films to my queue.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on January 29, 2020, 12:00:43 AM
This is a true classic you probably haven't heard about from 1955 called No Time for Sergeants with Andy Griffith.
When I was growing up, my mom worked for a TV distributor and when this came on during the day, she would call me at home during this scene, laughing her butt off and beg me to watch it. Of course once I noted it was black and white, I dismissed it immediately, almost always.
Once I watched it, I then watched the entire film, ad nauseam.

Andry Griffith plays Will Stockdale who is the truest form of a hillbilly who is accused of dodging the draft.
The Government finally finds him and enters him in to the Air Force.
It's a simple fish out of water story that is played perfectly by Griffith.
There's no hidden theme, no plot twists, no mind bending arc, just clean for all pure comedy.
I dont know if younger guys will get the same kick out of it having grown up on vastly different films, but here's a brief scene with the psychiatrist that grabbed me and everyone I ever showed it to.


This is one of my favorites.  The saluting toilets are great.

Something special for the Captain  :D



Ever since watching Run Silent, Run Deep on my flight, I've been wanting to go back to some other 50s era films. This clip had me stifling laughter at work, I may need to put this one on my list.

I would love to hear your opinion if you ever give it a look.

You guys have had some amazing clips the last few days, and also added a couple films to my queue.

yea, I'm enjoying these threads  :D
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on February 05, 2020, 12:25:25 PM
You never forget your first.
I was 8 years old when I saw Magnum Force with my parents...yea, you read that right lol
Although I did get my eyes covered on the pool scene.  :D

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: BojackHorsefella on February 05, 2020, 03:02:53 PM
It's a well I come back to often, but, back in my Circuit City days, I used to find random movies in DVD bins all of the time. This one, from 2007, stars Christian Slater before his resurgence via a guest role in Archer and eventual role on Mr. Robot. It's called "He Was A Quiet Man."

I remember reading the box although I couldn't tell you what it said, but Wiki comes through for that:

"Bob Maconel (Slater) is an insignificant office worker who fantasizes about murdering his coworkers. On one particularly bad day, Bob is about to go on a murderous rampage when his coworker Ralf Coleman (David Wells) beats him to it, shooting up the office and killing several people. Bob shoots Coleman dead with the gun he planned to use on the others."


The clip I've attached is the very start of the movie, beginning with what I suppose would be Bob's "manifesto." Although the movie is from 2007, I bet the rhetoric sounds very familiar from a lot of incel, MRA and just flat-out white supremacy culture. The movie, after the initial shooting, takes a turn with many good things happening to Bob, and yet he can't fully understand why he deserves this, considering what he had set out to do. The movie itself is a tale of Bob feeling like an outsider because of everyone else, but as the movie goes on, we see that Bob's only real issue is his own insecurity. His problems are his own.


I don't know how it would play today, and I can't say the last time I watched it. The whole film is apparently on Youtube, which, wow, but I imagine it may be up for rent on Amazon and such. I remember being absolutely floored by the ending at the time, although catching up on it, I imagine I'd have some different feelings about it now. However, you know how sometimes you find a little cult flick that most people haven't seen, and you cling to that as your recommendation? I've had a few. He Was a Quiet Man was probably the first of that, for me. Something I felt like only I had ever seen, it was my own, free to share with those I wanted to or it could remain a mystery to everyone else.

Anyway, here's the opening:

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on February 05, 2020, 05:31:48 PM
that sounds interesting
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on February 07, 2020, 03:07:17 PM
I'm pulling this scene from the Sopranos. David Chase has a real talent for incorporating music in to his scenes.
This particular one ends this episode as things begin to ramp up between NY and New Jersey, and within Tony's ranks.
I doubt it will mean much to anyone who didnt watch the show, but it was an impactful scene within the Soprano realm.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on February 15, 2020, 02:44:21 PM
So 1977 was a good year for films and one in particular would be the catalyst for me seeing movies over and over again.
Most think Star Wars in 77 and rightfully so, but you know, if it hadn't been for Star Wars, the highest grossing film that year would have been Smokey and the Bandit. People dont recall this film fondly which surprises me because being barely second to a film that is always in the top tier discussions in "greatest of..." roundtables is quite baffling to me.
So now you know, this is the film that turned me in to a rewatch nerd.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on February 16, 2020, 05:39:27 PM
I'm pulling this scene from the Sopranos. David Chase has a real talent for incorporating music in to his scenes.
This particular one ends this episode as things begin to ramp up between NY and New Jersey, and within Tony's ranks.
I doubt it will mean much to anyone who didnt watch the show, but it was an impactful scene within the Soprano realm.


This was a damn good episode, and should've given anyone watching the episode a sense that things were getting ready to go off the following season.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on February 16, 2020, 07:01:39 PM
I'm pulling this scene from the Sopranos. David Chase has a real talent for incorporating music in to his scenes.
This particular one ends this episode as things begin to ramp up between NY and New Jersey, and within Tony's ranks.
I doubt it will mean much to anyone who didnt watch the show, but it was an impactful scene within the Soprano realm.


This was a damn good episode, and should've given anyone watching the episode a sense that things were getting ready to go off the following season.

Agree. This series was so freakin good.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on February 21, 2020, 05:21:56 PM
Going back to 1981 for this scene from Arthur.
I was a teenager when this came out and while I really enjoyed the film, I never really appreciated just how great Dudley Moore was at pulling off being a drunk in such great fashion until I was older. It truly is a stellar performance.
With so many great lines and scenes in this film, it was hard to pick one.
I loved the line where his fiancť told him at dinner that a real woman could stop him from drinking.
"It'd have to be a real big woman."  :D

This scene, Liza Minelli, who was also fantastic in this film along with her father just cracks me up.

I cant help it, I have to post two here because the scene with the moose is just money. Arthur is fascinated by the moose and cant keep from referencing the animal.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on February 22, 2020, 08:21:44 AM
Haven't seen that movie in ages, and yes, Dudley Moore was brilliant. I remember him making me laugh in this movie when I was little because of his antics...I might watch it a little differently now though, picking up on things that I couldn't then.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on February 22, 2020, 09:32:15 AM
So...40 years ago today.

I really thought about posting the scene where they do the bag skate after the Norway exhibition match where Herb Brooks (excellently portrayed by Kurt Russell) just keeps saying "AGAIN!". It's an amazing scene, and it would fit in with this thread...actually I'll do that anyway. Unfortunately this clip doesn't have coach's line "You guys don't want to work during the game? No problem, we'll work now". Coach says something like that, you know it's gonna get real lol.



As a bonus, I'll just give you the final minute of the real life moment it's based on. If you have no clue what I'm talking about at this point, what f'ing rock have you been living under?


Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on February 22, 2020, 12:37:40 PM
outstanding scene!
I could not wait for this movie to come out and I hoped, sincerely hoped it would do justice to the Miracle and I believe it did. I mean, its tough to make a movie about hockey in a way where someone that knows nothing about it can understand and relate.

This scene still gets me, I dont think there will be a day when it doesn't it.

Seeing as how its the anniversary, I might just pull that one up today.
And by the by, that HBO doc made eons ago about the miracle on ice? I use that more than the movie to introduce people to this game, so well done and it really gives a great background to the state of our country and the world which is what lent so much emotion to that game.

Great post norm

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on February 22, 2020, 08:10:09 PM
tanks for that reminder norm. Watched that today and wept like a sappy little girl and am a better man for it  ;)
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on February 23, 2020, 01:36:18 AM
tanks for that reminder norm. Watched that today and wept like a sappy little girl and am a better man for it  ;)

Me too and I'm not the least bit ashamed to admit it. :)
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on February 26, 2020, 11:34:41 AM
tanks for that reminder norm. Watched that today and wept like a sappy little girl and am a better man for it  ;)

Me too and I'm not the least bit ashamed to admit it. :)

lol  :woot:
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on March 03, 2020, 12:35:41 AM
This entry comes courtesy of gene Wilder and Richard Pryor.
Always a terrific duo and it started here with Silver Streak in 1976.
I wasn't even a teenager yet but even a sophisticated comedy/adventure flick with these two became part of my makeup.
My movie going career was in its infancy, but these two just jumped off the screen for me and have been favorites ever since.
In this scene, Richard Pryor is trying to get the fugitive, George Caldwell, past the cops checkpoint and back on to the Silver Streak.
I cant tell you how many times in my life Ive uttered this phrase...
"C'mon man, get some jive goin, be cool"
Gene Wilder plays the stale white guy so perfectly, it plays beautifully, especially off of Richard Pryor.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on March 09, 2020, 06:32:51 PM
This scene is an early high school teen se comedy depicting students in Florida in the 50's.
Beginning with Animal House, the teen comedy was becoming a staple, or subgenera if you will, but I cant recall one that sunk to the depths that Porky's did and by that I mean, this is not the Breakfast Club.
As a just high schooler myself, I remember seeing this at the theatre multiple times for this, and well, at least one other scene (wink wink) and while I haunt watched the full movie in years, I doubt it would hold up about as well as any late night cable movie from that time. However, I always have fond memories of my friends and I laughing hysterically throughout this scene multiple times.
And looking at it now, Im really surprised they were able to capture this scene with so many actors all in one shot, especially since suppressing laughter is so contagious. Not to mention, laughing is supposedly harder than crying for an actor.
In any event, if you have a few (4:00) minutes, take a look. Takes it a minute to get going but here's the synopsis:

A few guys were spying on the girls shower through the faucet holes, and one of them decided to stick his "tallywhacker" as you'll hear in the scene though and have some fun.
The girls coach walks in and the student girls file out orderly. His buddies tell him that a girl is interested and "grabs him" which is a great scene by itself.
But this is the aftermath. She goes to the principal along with the male coaches to demand a lineup to catch the perp.

Hint, keep an eye on the two coaches in the front, especially the blonde fella who had another exceptional laugh scene earlier.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on March 24, 2020, 06:47:45 PM
Dammit, how did I miss this post? Haven't seen Porky's in forever.

Anyway, I could post a bunch of different scenes from this movie but this is the one that always gets me every single time. Leslie Nielsen was the best.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on March 24, 2020, 10:31:37 PM
That Porky's movie was so raunchy lol and that scene was so contagious with the laughter.

Man, Leslie Nielson was just plain money!
I remember when I saw him in on Carson, he was just the same. Reminded me of a great storyteller, like Tim Conway or Bob Uecker. haha
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on April 02, 2020, 01:30:07 PM
Cheech and Chong Next Movie

Their rock comedy albums were legendary just a few short years later when Up In Smoke arrived in 78 and I was completely on board.
Listening to their albums again and again and seeing their movies again an again. With so many great ones, I tend to revert back to the welfare office scene in Next Movie (1980)
While Cheech is receiving special attention from his girlfriend slash welfare worker in the back room, Chong is to hang out for a while among folks who need a helping hand as well.
I recognized the old man from the Burt Reynolds classic, The Longest Yard (1974) and of course Michael Winslow appears here in his first over film.
C&C also gave him a role in Nice Dreams which came out in 1981.
Winslow would go on to great acclaim in the Police Academy films beginning just four years from his debut.

This scene always got me because of the old man's ability to laugh on cue and of course, Winslow just being a one man show per the norm.
I liked how the old man would be cued to laugh by the weary man across from him folding over in to a deep sleep but the abrupt outburst would sit him straight up...and the ashes on the cigarette lol. So much to enjoy here for me.
Siting in the theatre laughing my ass off at these guys for years and years.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on April 26, 2020, 05:27:06 PM
The first time I saw this picture, it's safe to say I had no idea what it was about, only that it was one I read about in the teen music and movie mags (no internet then and this was how you stayed hip)

If you've seen it, you know. When it starts, it was obviously a campy film but th audience was shouting in unison at the screen and it seemed like fun.
When we introduced to the "guests" at the mansion, I was thinking, ok, this is getting to be a bit much.
Boy was I in store for a surprise.
I didnt know what transexuals were, I barely knew what homosexuals were, and it's safe to say, my youthful eyes had never seen anything like this before.
After it was over, I was hooked. The audience participation was off the charts an soon, I was a regular

I even had th soundtrack. Don't judge, it's unhealthy.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on May 04, 2020, 12:35:45 PM
I love that movie, and damn I miss Tim Curry. Yes I know he's still alive but damn that stroke.

Anyway, since it's May the 4th I felt I had to share one of the best scenes from the best Star Wars movie since Disney took over. This was that "oh shit, it's about to get real" moment, and helped to remind a lot of people that growing up, Darth Vader was the baddest villain in the galaxy.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on May 07, 2020, 02:01:58 PM
That was such a great scene!
Before Ep 9, I watched all the SW in order and this was the coolest transition from film to film.

City Slickers

This was one of those films like Back to the Future where our whole family went to see it on a night out.
It's such a fun film toes, everyone had a great time, it's just one of those instances that was rare that Ill enjoy my entire life.
I love this clip at :58 when Billy Crystal's friends completely abandoned him, like a true friend would in such a case lol

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on May 11, 2020, 10:05:34 AM
Fun fact: I've never seen City Slickers. :gasp: So I used to work at Blockbuster for a few years, and this movie came out during that time. Like all New Releases, this one was really difficult to get the first few weeks it was on VHS. I also have this thing where...well, you know how when someone tells you that you just *have* to check out this new so and so, and then you get stubborn and say well now I'm not going to check it out?
Only certain people could give me that response...and one of them was our store manager at the time. Smarmy douchey little f'er. Well damn if he didn't love that movie, and just had to find people to see it too and talk about it, and give you a little grief if you hadn't seen it yet. Naturally it went from I need to check that out at some point to 'not in your lifetime' (he never realized why most of the other people that worked for him didn't see it either). Anyway, I need to add that back to the "need to check it out" pile again. Man I really hated that guy lol

So here's one of my favorite cameo appearances ever from Airplane!. "Listen kid, I've been hearing that crap ever since I was at UCLA."


Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on May 11, 2020, 11:18:43 AM
lol norm, I love a guy who can hold a grudge and take a stand  :D
Yea, it really is a good fun flick, Id be curious to hear your thoughts about it

And you just cant go wrong with Airplane!!
KAJ was great, but Im still partial to June Cleaver, you know, the jive talking honkey
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on May 14, 2020, 09:07:27 PM
Going with a classic here for obvious reasons.
This movie really captured the epitome of the stereotypes it was presenting which is what made it so relatable.
Being on my way out of high school when this film dropped made it so much more special to me and my friends.
Great scenes throughout, and I had a tough tie deciding which to go with here, but ultimately this won out because it was so quotable, and believe me, used again and again ad nauseam.
A close second was the, "is your dad Mr. Rogers?"
"No, Mr. Johnson" lol

Oh and, "that's impossible sir, it's in Johnson's shorts." Stoner buds in school dropped this one a lot.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on May 26, 2020, 01:06:46 AM
This scene isn't deeply meaningful to me like some others in this thread, but I just pulled this flick out of the re watch bin yesterday and it's still quite fun to watch. Just the perfect blend of camp, comedy and action. I feel like Pirates of the Caribbean followed this films palate which is not a bad thing.
So, this scene has Danny Glover robbing the bank with Maverick (Mel Gibson) inside and during the hold up, they share this flash of recognition with a beautifully set up score from Lethal Weapon playing faintly as they strain to recall if they know each other.
Fun stuff.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on May 26, 2020, 09:31:40 AM
That may be my favorite scene from that movie, which I honestly haven't seen since it dropped. Even has Murtaugh's classic line at the end...which I find myself uttering more and more lol.

Now I may have to fire up those Lethal Weapon movies for a rewatch.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on May 26, 2020, 09:46:02 AM
yea it was great how they tossed that line in at the end.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on June 05, 2020, 05:54:13 AM
Start your Friday off with a chuckle..it is Friday isn't it?
You fellas probably dont know this show, but SOAP was a spoof of all the daytime soap operas which were unbelievably huge at the time (late seventies and especially 80's) and it was a huge hit.
I think it was the first show that continually ran the viewer discretion warning announcement during the first season. All in the Family had the serious disclaimer prior to its airing of the pilot but not before every show.
This program was meant to be so over the top while having serious thematic arcs and it hit on all cylinders.
You see Billy Crystal in his first big break as Jodie, a gay man wanting a sex change (this caused a huge outrage at the time) Richard Mulligan at his best as Bert Campbell and a stellar cast, quite a few who ironically were soap stars in the 60's and 70's.
Frank sex discussions (I think this show was the first to use the word horny), marital infidelity, murder, interracial dating, prison,  a ventriloquist and space aliens are just a few topics. If you need to check out for a while and just laugh, give this a look.


My family used to watch this show religiously and I remember us laughing our asses off and we recalled so many scenes over the years with fondness, it was really a good memory and I still think of us all sitting around watching SOAP.
This scene features Jay Johnstone (still active today) as Chuck (the ventriloquist) with Bob who is trying to ease family tensions during a tough time with some comedic relief.
I love the incredulous look on Mary's face throughout as both Danny (Ted Waas) and Bert (Richard Mulligan) buy in to Bob's ability to read minds.
Take two minutes...




Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on June 08, 2020, 02:36:01 PM
Soap...I vaguely remember that show but I remember watching Benson (the spinoff, right?) more. That was a good one though...

Anyway, five pages in and we haven't touched on Godfather? Huh, time to fix that. I think this scene here perfectly sets up the finale of the first movie. Granted you miss Michael and Vito's conversation before this that provides the "oh damn, it's him that flipped" moment for everyone. Barzini with just a look of no real remorse for the family but mild contempt, and then openly celebrating his apparent coronation. Whoops. Damn I love these first two movies.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: BojackHorsefella on June 08, 2020, 06:21:16 PM
This one's not a movie, and requires some setup. I apologize.

I recently began, for the first time ever, watching Avatar: The Last Airbender on Netflix. Well, actually, I've already finished it. An amazing series.

It seems the overall consensus is that season 2, episode 15, "Tales of Ba Sing Se," is one of the best episodes of the series, and that's a sentiment I agree with. I imagine part of it is just that it's an anthology style episode and those are always pretty fun. We follow individual characters on short journeys, mostly character enforcing.

One of the characters who gets his own segment is Uncle Iroh. Iroh was a general in the Fire Nation, known for his 600 day siege on Ba Sing Se, which he ultimately had to retreat from during the war. Since then, Iroh has accompanied his nephew, Prince Zuko, to find and capture the Avatar.

However, throughout the show, Iroh's seen as a pretty chill dude. He mostly wants to drink tea, and at this point, him and Zuko have been banned from the Fire Nation and are secretly living in the Earth-bending capital of Ba Sing Se (it sounds like a lot, it's really not, please watch this show it's incredible).

We know Iroh is different from how the Fire Nation has been portrayed due to his lessons for Zuko, who is controlled by anger and a need to restore his honor. In this episode, seeing Iroh on his own without Zuko, strolling around the city, behaving the same way he does with Zuko, further reinforces his good heart and intentions.

We don't know much about Iroh, except that he was the Fire Lord's brother, his previous turn as a general, and he once had a son. We don't know much about his son, how old he was, or what happened to him.

Early in the episode, Iroh's at a market and a small child starts crying and his mother can't make him stop. Iroh pulls out an instrument and plays a little song. The child is holding a little toy, and Iroh sings about "brave soldier boy." it's a touching moment, played for something as a lark as the boy stops crying, but then grabs and pulls on Iroh's (impressive) beard.

Iroh continues to stroll, helping others here and there (this harkens back to something Iroh says in a far earlier episode, when he states "sometimes the best way to help yourself is by helping others). He even helps a man that attempts to mug him.

However, then we get to the end of the episode. Iroh lays out his belongings, and speaks to his son, saying "if only I could have helped you." Then, we get a reprise of the song.

Additionally, the man who voiced Uncle Iroh, Mako (who you may recall as the voice of Aku from Samurai Jack, or even as Master Splinter in that "TMNT" cartoon movie from the early 2000s), passed away after this episode, making this the last time he would voice the character. The man who took over for him (and also voiced Aku in the final Samurai Jack season), refuses to sing the song out of respect for Mako.

And, with that, I give you one of the most famous scenes from the show: the "Leaves From the Vine" scene. I watched this weeks ago and it's just stuck with me.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on July 01, 2020, 01:27:42 AM
This man deserves his own thread. But since Iím not ready to do that yet, Iíll just leave this here. Godspeed and RIP, good sir. 98 years is one helluva life...really hoping to make one of your final wishes come true soon enough.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on July 10, 2020, 05:00:07 PM
This man deserves his own thread. But since Iím not ready to do that yet, Iíll just leave this here. Godspeed and RIP, good sir. 98 years is one helluva life...really hoping to make one of your final wishes come true soon enough.


Reiner had such a great mind for comedy, and certainly the talent. Miss him already.

Im going back to When Harry Met Sally for this one. It's one of the few date or chick movies I enjoyed, and I mean, Meg Ryan, cmon.
This is the famous fake orgasm scene in which Meg .... well... fakes it, a a diner.
Billy Crystal is terrific with his expressions. At first he is concerned, but then he realizes what she is doing and that he's going to have to settle in and absorb the whole ride. The ambience in the restaurant slowly dies down as she becomes more and more frenzied and everyone begins to to stare and gawk and when it's all done, she returns to normal as if , well, she faked it lol


This clip seems really benign now but at the time, it really was poignant in more ways than one because that was a topi of the times.
And as a young 20 something male, I of course had to play it off but knowing damn well I was Billy Crystal. Lucky my SO didnt shame me like that, but that scene still stuck with me.


Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on July 21, 2020, 08:27:51 PM
Happy Birthday, good sir...still can't believe all these years later you're gone. I could pick any number of funny moments, but I think I'll go with my favorite drama scene with him instead.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on July 28, 2020, 09:47:59 PM
always a good choice.
It's so sad how his journey ended. I cant imagine facing the choices he had.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on August 06, 2020, 07:18:27 PM
My cousin and I saw this film about a hundred and fifty thousand times when it came out.
So many great scenes but this one resonated because it is such a fuck your buddy then deal with the consequences kinda thing that we thrived on.
"Can't spend your whole life worrying about your mistakes. You fucked up, you trusted us. hey, make the best of it."

LOL  :D


Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on August 06, 2020, 07:50:18 PM
"My advice to you is to start drinking heavily."
"Better listen to him Flounder. He's pre-med."

I don't know how often I uttered that phrase during drinking nights in college, but it was a lot. Damn I love that scene and that movie...great choice.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on August 23, 2020, 08:45:48 PM
"My advice to you is to start drinking heavily."
"Better listen to him Flounder. He's pre-med."

I don't know how often I uttered that phrase during drinking nights in college, but it was a lot. Damn I love that scene and that movie...great choice.

I enjoyed how they tacked on to that joke at the hearing when Otter stands to defend Delta and Hoover says, don't screw around, they're serious this time.
Otter: Take it easy, I'm pre law.
Boone: I thought you were pre med?
Otter: What's the difference?
LOL


My net offering is from Arthur, and no, not that god awful Russell Brandt horseshit remake. And btw, I say that confidently without having seen it.
Dudley Moore plays a playboy drunk who is at his fiancť's house to meet with her father whom he is terrified of because it's a forced marriage and he doesn't want to go through with it.
If you ever need an example of delivery an comedic timing in a movie, this is unparalleled.
Take 1:11 and watch, or re live this gem. This movie is fantastic.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on August 29, 2020, 04:14:51 PM
Yeah, let's do this one today. Message is just as important now-maybe even more so-as it was back in 2018 when the film was released.

"Now, more than ever, the illusions of division threaten our very existence. We all know the truth: more connects us than separates us. But in times of crisis the wise build bridges, while the foolish build barriers. We must find a way to look after one another as if we were one single tribe."

Rest in power, Chadwick Boseman.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Rigg44 on August 31, 2020, 05:49:04 PM
Yeah, let's do this one today. Message is just as important now-maybe even more so-as it was back in 2018 when the film was released.

"Now, more than ever, the illusions of division threaten our very existence. We all know the truth: more connects us than separates us. But in times of crisis the wise build bridges, while the foolish build barriers. We must find a way to look after one another as if we were one single tribe."

Rest in power, Chadwick Boseman.


At the time more of a throw away scence for me but in the current climate, very good scene indeed.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on October 08, 2020, 11:21:59 PM
This is more about the movie than this one scene, although it is a great DeNiro bit.
Midnight Run is another film my mom and I really enjoyed together.
Numerous times we would get together and watch this film, and even though she didnt know a lot about other movies, she certainly could quote Midnight Run back to me lol
I would go over to her house and we would cook a big dinner then chill with Midnight Run. Such a fun movie that holds wonderful memories of sharing it with my mother.
I'm sure everyone has seen it, but if you havent, check it out, and if you have, see it again.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on November 01, 2020, 06:53:59 AM
RIP Sean Connery. The original and arguably the best 007, and a legendary actor. Oddly enough, my favorite role of his was the sub captain Marko Ramius from The Hunt for Red October (also one of the best submarine movies ever). But Iíll go with this scene here.

ďHe sends one of yours to the hospital, you send one of his to the morgue. THATíS the Chicago Way.Ē



Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on November 01, 2020, 01:04:26 PM
His Untouchables was so Connery, I loved it.
How you think he fells now? Better? Or worse?


I was kinda sad to see after he died most every post was about The Rock.
Fuckin kids, expand your horizons beyond the 90's. He was James Bond ya know. Life did exist before the 90's and Daniel Craig.
 
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on November 01, 2020, 04:31:00 PM
Lol

As for Bond...honestly I think both he and Craig are 1 and 1A. Both thoroughly enjoyable to watch.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: BojackHorsefella on November 01, 2020, 05:48:57 PM
Lol

As for Bond...honestly I think both he and Craig are 1 and 1A. Both thoroughly enjoyable to watch.

The movies around him sucked (at least World and, obviously, Die Another Day), but I won't stand for this Pierce Brosnan erasure!

In truth, I don't know that I've actually seen a Connery-Bond film. Bond's always been one that seemed overwhelming to tackle, before the ones I was old enough to start watching as they released.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on November 02, 2020, 01:30:42 PM
It kinda is, but not really, if youre interested. It's sorta like going through the Hitchcock library.
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on November 03, 2020, 01:47:23 PM
West Wing is one of my all-time favorite shows. Think I'll go with this one today, for Election Day.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on November 03, 2020, 02:52:19 PM
lol I forgot all about that scene.
True to life. Scary
Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on November 30, 2020, 04:13:04 PM
Ive posted PTA before but since T-day is barely beyond us, I wanted to give this one some recognition.
I absolutely love Edie McGlurg here and pretty much in any project in which I find her.
Steve Martin is money as always.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on December 05, 2020, 01:41:45 PM
I was belting out this tune yesterday for no reason as I often do and told myself it needs a mention here.
Again, one of the films I watched multiple times at the theatre and not to mention this was a staple in the heyday of cable.
Stripes is such a fun romp with Murray, Ramis and Candy. This tune has been in my head ever since.

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: TheNorm on February 06, 2021, 04:08:04 PM
Apparently it's Michael Mann's birthday. I vaguely remember him as the guy behind the Miami Vice tv series that I watched growing up, but Heat was where he really registered for me. It's been a really really long time since I've seen this movie, and I know there was way more to the film than just a setup for one of the best shootout scenes ever...but damn this is good. This film was also the first time you'd have Al Pacino and Robert De Niro in the same scene together, and this movie is also one of the inspirations for the GTA series...and if you've played GTA V some of this may feel similar. :)

Title: Re: Scene it
Post by: Crewe on February 06, 2021, 09:32:08 PM
that is such a fantastic movie, not to mention the scene itself.

the sound design here is pure art and the actors were all top notch. I thought Pacino was so money in this scene. And following him throughout was terrific directing.
If I had one tiny thing to complain about, it would be the ubiquitous uniformed officer being picked off.